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how to fix Tech2 reports SAAB mass airflow deviation issue P0101

Le 7 January 2018, 12:00 dans Humeurs 0

MY GM Tech 2 Diagnostic Scan Tool has reported this issue for a while. My car has been throwing a mass airflow deviation code sporadically while driving. I reset my ecu, drive around for a while but the code will pop up again. When it throws the code the ecu also limits torque (the 04’s way of limp home mode).
I have gone through all of the vacuum lines and was not able to find a single leak anywhere. I think the MAF sensor is bad but I just wanted to get an opinion before I buy a new one.
Here are two pictures showing what the Tech2 Scanner is reading, one is the fuel adaption and trim which should be close to 0% I believe and the car is doing this because of the air deviation. The other is the actual air deviation test; normal fuel correction should be closer to zero, I think it says normal range is between +/- 5% and same goes for the air deviation at idle.

I also took a video of the numbers read from the MAF sensor, which should be sitting between 3.5-4.5 g/s at idle. Mine sits below 3.5 most of the time and jumps up above 5 sometimes.

 

http://blog.belletoday.com.ph/emilyzhang/1356828/gm-tech2-tis2000-failed-to-run-win7-virtual-machine.html

9th January 2015 update:
Replaced the MAF today, and the readings on the sensor are better (I think that MAF was going bad, I think there are multiple problems) but I’m still getting the p0101 airflow deviation code. I don’t believe that there is a leak on the line or in the intercooler anymore because I ran some tests with the tech 2 and noticed the only time there is an airflow deviation is during idle or letting off the gas. While under high load, deviation sat at right around 0%.
Going to try some more stuff out tommorow. Will report back.

10th January 2015 update:
Today I replaced the Charge Air Solenoid which is located on top of the turbo bypass valve next to the intake filter box. I drove the car around for a while with the tech2 and the air deviation was sitting right around 0%!
I think it is fixed now, I’m going to drive it for a few days to test but so far it seems the MAF and the Charge Air Solenoid were both going bad if not bad already. When I looked up what can happen when that solenoid goes bad, a few spots said it can cause the turbo to “pump” when letting off the gas which in my case caused a sharp fluctuation in MAF calculated and recieved during that time. It also is used to regulate engine idling so I believe thats why I was seeing a large deviation in idle as well.

Autel MaxiSys Elite Diagnostic and ECU Programming System

Le 24 December 2017, 07:13 dans Humeurs 0

Autel Maxisys Elite Diagnostic Tool and ECU Programming System The Next Generation of Smart Car Diagnostic Scan Tool. AUTEL MAXISYS Elite itself has already supported ECU programming function for BENZ and BMW cars, if you need to get support for more car models, you must use Autel MaxiFlash Elite J2534along with OEM software to implement this function. J2534 DEVICE can not only use with AUTEL MAXISYS Elite, but also can work on other OEM software.

The MaxiSys Elite, the newest addition to the MaxiSys line of highly advanced smart diagnostic tools, is based on the fast and intuitive Android operating system. Powered by NVIDIA’s Tegra? 4, the world’s fastest mobile processor, its visually stunning 9.7” Retina display offers ultra-high resolutions up to 2048×1536 and an optimized array of sophisticated and powerful applications. The MaxiSys Elite rapidly performs every job from comprehensive vehicle diagnostics & analysis to advanced ECU Programming . 2x faster than any comparable device, the MaxiSys Elite provides extended battery life and intelligent power saving. The MaxiSys Elite from Obd2tool.com offers a super-sensitive capacitive screen able to respond to gloved, moistened, and even greasy fingers! The ergonomically angled docking station provides optimum visibility and convenient charging that eliminates power concerns.

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http://obd2toolbella.sosblog.fr/Premier-blog-b1/CIP-Coding-Individualization-and-Programming-Menu-FOR-EVERY-YEARMAKE-AND-MODEL-SOLVED-b1-p24.htm

CRP12X Premium Introduction And General Information

Le 12 December 2017, 13:55 dans Humeurs 0

 

Category : Launch X431

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1. Introduction
The CRP123 Premium(CRP129 PREMIUM) Series are specially developed by LAUNCH, which supports all 10 modes of OBD II test for a complete diagnosis. Featuring the 3.5″ TFT color display, it enables users to read/dear DTCs, record, save and playback data in live graphic display. The CRP129 Premium (CRP123 PREMIUM) Series are also very easy to use. With built-in help menus and code definitions, diagnosing and repairing that dreaded Check Engine Light is now easier than ever!

Moreover, CRP12X Premium Series also feature the following bi-directional “special tests”: EVAP, 02 Sensor, I/M Readiness, MIL Status, VIN Info, and On-board monitors testing.

It can be connected to PC through the USB cable for upgrade to keep updated with the latest software version.

Note: CRP129 Premium (CRP123 Premium) Series may automatically reset while being disturbed by strong static electricity. THIS IS A NORMAL REACTION.

2. General Information
2.1 On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) II

The first generation of On-Board Diagnostics (OBD I) was developed by the California Air Resources Board (ARB) and implemented in 1988 to monitor some of the emission control components on vehicles. As technology evolved and the desire to improve the On-Board Diagnostic system increased, a new generation of On-Board Diagnostic system was developed. This second generation of On-Board Diagnostic regulations is called “OBD If.

The OBD2 Scanner is designed to monitor emission control systems and key engine components by performing either continuous or periodic tests of specific components and vehicle conditions. When a problem is detected, the OBD II system turns on a warning lamp (MIL) on the vehicle instrument panel to alert the driver typically by the phrase of “Check Engine” or “Service Engine Soon”. The system will also store important information about the detected malfunction so that a technician can accurately find and fix the problem. Here below follow three pieces of such valuable information:

1)Whether the Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) is commanded ‘on’ or ‘off;

2)Which, if any, Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) are stored;

3)Readiness Monitor status.

2.2 Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs)

OBD2 Code Reader are codes that are stored by the on-board computer diagnostic system in response to a problem found in the vehicle. These codes identify a particular problem area and are intended to provide you with a guide as to where a fault might be occurring within a vehicle. OBD II Diagnostic Trouble Codes consist of a five-digit alphanumeric code. The first character, a letter, identifies which control system sets the code. The second character, a number, 0-3; other three characters, a hex character, 0-9 or A-F provide additional information on where the DTC originated and the operating conditions that caused it to set. Here below is an example to illustrate the structure of the digits:

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2.3 Location of the Data Link Connector (DLC)
The DLC (Data Link Connector or Diagnostic Link Connector) is typically a 16-pin connector where diagnostic code readers interface with the vehicle’s on-board computer. The DLC is usually located 12 inches from the center of the instrument panel (dash), under or around the driver’s side for most vehicles. If Data Link Connector is not located under dashboard, a label should be there telling location. For some Asian and European vehicles, the DLC is located behind the ashtray and the ashtray must be removed to access the connector. If the DLC cannot be found,refer to the vehicle’s service manual for the location.

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2.4 OBD II Readiness Monitors
An important part of a vehicle’s OBD II system is the Readiness Monitors, which are indicators used to find out if all of the emissions components have been evaluated by the OBD II system. They are running periodic tests on specific systems and components to ensure that they are performing within allowable limits.
Currently, there are eleven OBD II Readiness Monitors (or I/M Monitors) defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Not all monitors are supported in every vehicles and the exact number of monitors in any vehicle depends on the motor vehicle manufacturer’s emissions control strategy.
Continuous Monitors — Some of the vehicle components or systems are continuously tested by the vehicle’s OBD II system, while others are tested only under specific vehicle operating conditions. The continuously monitored components listed below are always ready:

1. Misfire
2. Fuel System
3. Comprehensive Components (CCM)
Once the vehicle is running, the OBD II system is continuously checking the above components, monitoring key engine sensors, watching for engine misfire, and monitoring fuel demands.
Non-Continuous Monitors — Unlike the continuous monitors, many emissions and engine system components require the vehicle to be operated under specific conditions before the monitor is ready. These monitors are termed non-continuous monitors and are listed below:
1) EGR System
2) O2 Sensors
3) Catalyst
4) Evaporative System
5) O2 Sensor Heater
6) Secondary air Injection
7) Heated Catalyst
8) A/C system
2.5 OBD II Monitor Readiness Status
OBD II systems must indicate whether or not the vehicle’s PCM’s monitor system has completed testing on each component. Components that have been tested will be reported as “Ready”, or “Complete”, meaning they have been tested by the OBD II system. The purpose of recording readiness status is to allow inspectors to determine if the vehicle’s OBD II system has tested all the components and/or systems.

The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) sets a monitor to “Ready” or “Complete” after an appropriate drive cycle has been performed. The drive cycle that enables a monitor and sets readiness codes to “Ready” varies for each individual monitor. Once a monitor is set as “Ready” or “Complete”, it will remain in this state. A number of factors, including erasing of Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) with a code reader or a disconnected battery, can result in Readiness Monitors being set to “Not Ready”. Since the three continuous monitors are constantly evaluating,
they will be reported as “Ready” all of the time. If testing of a particular supported non-continuous monitor has not been completed, the monitor status will be reported as “Not Complete” or “Not Ready.”
In order for the OBD monitor system to become ready, the vehicle should be driven under a variety of normal operating conditions. These operating conditions may include a mix of highway driving and stop and go, city type driving, and at least one overnight-off period. For specific information on getting your vehicle’s OBD monitor system ready, please consult your vehicle owner’s manual.

http://forobd2tool.com/blog/2017/12/08/crp12x-premium-introduction-and-general-information/

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